Simon Fraser University

Lois Klassen

Lois
Klassen

My field of research is art in sites of intense ethical demand or human rights violations. I have been studying the way artists intervene or respond to forced and failed migrations, militarized and free-trade border zone cultures, and the damaged environmental ecologies that are often associated with inequities in border regions. I host an on-going art project, Reading the Migration Library, that invites participants to produce small artist books on themes related to human and ecological migration. My research has been enabled by a Fulbright Scholarship with University of Texas in El Paso (2020) and an artist’s residency at Santa Fe Art Institute (2015). As a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at SFU’s School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT), I am researching the impact of artists’ practices (including research-creation methods) on ethics in the development of machine learning technologies. I serve as the parttime coordinator of the research ethics board at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. As a member of the Canadian Association of Research Ethics Boards (CAREB) Circle of Experts, I provide consultation on research ethics in research-creation, creative practice and cultural studies. My doctoral studies were completed in the Cultural Studies Program, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (2019).

(778) 994-7025

Profile Image

Simon Fraser University
Postdoc

Justine Mallou

Justine
Mallou

 My research focuses on the interplay between public policy analysis and political governance, with a particular focus on the development of ‘sanctuary city’, or Access Without Fear, policies in Canada. Canadian sanctuary city policies aim to support access to city services for residents with precarious or no immigration status. Through the application of a constructivist framework and qualitative research methodology, my research analyses how the issue of Canadian sanctuary city policies, particularly in Vancouver and Toronto, captured the attention of policymakers and gained entry to city council agendas.

Profile Image

Political Science
Simon Fraser University

Homayoon Fotros

Homayoon
Fotros

I am interested in examining the effects of international migration on immigrants’ source countries. I am also interested in the variation between the settlement patterns of ethnic groups of immigrants in Canada. I have conducted my Masters’ Capstone project on policy options to balance the distribution of immigrants, and investigating effective attraction and retention strategies to settle newcomers in non-traditional destinations.

Profile Image

Simon Fraser University

Steven Weldon

Steven
Weldon

My research examines anti-immigrant sentiment in the political arena, focusing on the psychological predispositions that lead people towards constructing narrower categories for immigrants. I’m also interested in the ways in which citizenship laws effect citizens’ view of outsiders; laws effecting migrants in pathway to citizenship; media and rise of the far right in Europe; and the representation of migration on both social and mainstream media.

(778) 782-4995

Profile Image

Political Science
Simon Fraser University
Affiliate Partner

Mark Pickup

Mark
Pickup

My research examines how identities and the norms attached to those identities and effects attitudes and behavior. Some of my work has analyzed the 2011 riots in England and the relationship between different types of perceived threats and perceptions and prejudices towards ethnic minority groups. I’m also interested in the interactions between Canada and the US and its effects on Canadian political identity.

(778) 782-8640

Profile Image

Political Science
Simon Fraser University
Affiliate Partner

Eline de Rooij

Eline
de Rooij

The goal of my project is to provide insights into how individuals come to feel part of a political community and how subsequent social interactions can help foster involvement in politics. My specific objectives are to: 1) explore, through semi-structured, in-depth interviews, how individuals transfer existing political attitudes (i.e. ideological and partisan preferences) and behaviours (e.g. voting, contacting politicians, demonstrating) to a new political context; 2) examine, through a large, online survey, the extent to which pre-migration political attitudes and behaviours impact on post-migration political attitudes and behaviours; 3) assess, by means of a field experiment,  the degree to which social networks foster individuals’ political attitudes and behaviours post-migration.

(778) 782-5858

Profile Image

Political Science
Simon Fraser University
Affiliate Partner