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Teaching Resources

CURRENT Related Courses

POLI 516C / PPGA 591H: Debates in Migration and Citizenship (Term 2)
Instructor: Antje Ellermann
Tuesdays, 9 - 12 PM

Human mobility has become one of the most contested issues in contemporary politics. This seminar surveys key scholarly debates in the study of migration and citizenship in political science and cognate disciplines. We comparatively examine in both historical and cross– national perspective the ways in which states and societies (particularly in the Global North) have responded to, and have become transformed by, immigration. The course covers a wide range of topics: theories of international migration and immigration regimes, theoretical approaches to migration studies, immigration and settler colonialism, the ethics of borders, migration control, public opinion on immigration, voting behaviour and populist radical right parties, the making of immigration policy, national identity and citizenship, immigrant inclusion, and multiculturalism and religion.


GERM 206/302: Exile, Flight and Migration (in English) (Term 2)
Instructor: Markus Hallensleben
Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 - 3:30 PM

This new course aims to introduce to the current themes and historical settings of exile, flight and migration. We will critically discuss topics such as diasporic and national belonging, asylum and integration politics, multiculturality and European cultural identity. All readings are in translation and focus on contemporary transnational German-language literature and film affected by migration. While the beginning of the course covers Jewish and political exile during National Socialism, the other parts deal with Germany as an immigration country since the fall of the wall in 1989, including its “Welcome Culture” as response to the global “refugee crisis” in 2015. This course fulfills the Arts Literature requirement.


PAST RELATED COURSES

FALL 2020

GERM 520A (3): Narratives of Migration
Instructor: Markus Hallensleben
Thursdays, 10:00 - 12:30 PM (synchronously online via UBC Canvas)

This course focuses on narratives of migration from a comparative studies point of view. While one part of the course will utilize Social Studies concepts of postmigration, super- diversity and plurality for an analysis of literary narratives as counter-narratives to Eurocentric, ethnically and nationally centred models of belonging, another part will investigate contemporary German-language authors who write about flight, immigration and refuge. How do their narratives perform hybrid and plural identities that go across borders, including the dealing with memories of colonial history, genocides and wars?


POLI 328C: The Comparative Politics of Immigration
Instructor: Antje Ellermann
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Human mobility has become one of the most contested issues in contemporary politics. This course provides an introduction to key scholarly debates in the study of migration and citizenship in political science and related disciplines. We comparatively examine the ways in which states and societies (particularly in the Global North) have responded to, and have become transformed by, immigration. We also seek to understand the multifold experiences of immigrants. The course covers a wide range of themes: theories of international migration, forced migration and humanitarian protection, immigration and settler colonialism, public opinion on immigration, the politics of immigration, the ethics of borders, the politics of borders, and the politics of immigrant inclusion.


2019/2020

POLI 516C/GPP 591G: Debates in Migration and Citizenship
Instructor: Antje Ellermann
Wednesdays, 2:00 - 5:00 pm

Human mobility has become one of the most contested issues in contemporary politics. This seminar surveys key scholarly debates in the study of migration and citizenship in political science and cognate disciplines. We comparatively examine in both historical and cross–national perspective the ways in which states and societies (particularly in the Global North) have responded to, and have become transformed by, immigration. The course covers a wide range of topics: theories of international migration and immigration regimes, theoretical approaches to migration studies, immigration and settler colonialism, the ethics of borders, migration control, public opinion on immigration, voting behaviour and populist radical right parties, the making of immigration policy, national identity and citizenship, immigrant inclusion, and multiculturalism and religion.

To view the course syllabus, please click here.


POLI 516C/Global Public Policy 591G, Migration and Citizenship
Instructor: Antje Ellermann
Wednesdays, 2:00 - 5:00 pm 

Human mobility has become one of the most contested issues in contemporary politics. This seminar surveys key scholarly debates in the study of migration and citizenship in political science and cognate disciplines. We comparatively examine in both historical and cross–national perspective the ways in which states and societies (particularly in the Global North) have responded to, and become transformed by, immigration. The course covers a wide range of areas: theories of international migration, the ethics of borders, migration control, immigration policy making, public attitudes, anti-immigrant populism and the rise of far-right parties, refugee protection, national identity and citizenship, immigrant integration and multiculturalism, and transnationalism and homeland-hostland politics.


GERM 506B: Intercultural Competence: Narratives of Belonging
Instructor: Markus Hallensleben
Thursdays, 2:00 - 4:00 pm

This course is open to graduate students from all fields and focuses on narratives of belonging from an interdisciplinary cultural studies perspective. How do people relate to place? Does the question “Where are you from?” assume a linear narrative and sedentarist perspective of exclusion? How do we narratively create and perform belonging, cultural spaces, phenomenological borders, national and ethnic identities? With an emphasis on contemporary postmigrant narratives from and about refugees and immigrants in German-language literature that have become central to society and in social studies, we will investigate counter-perspectives to Eurocentric, ethnically and nationally centred visions of identity.

To view the draft course syllabus, please click here.


2018/2019

FRENCH 512 (cross-listed with SPAN 501), Introduction to Mobility Studies
Instructor: Gaoheng Zhang
Wednesdays, 4:00 – 6:00 pm

This course will introduce Mobility Studies in relation to case studies focused on several mobile subjects—namely, merchants, explorers, tourists, colonizers, pilgrims, and migrants—within Italian, French, and Chinese contexts. As an umbrella social theory, Mobility Studies provides a new paradigm to explain significant social phenomena, which range from social inequality to global climate change, all of which are related to movements. Our course will contribute to cultural analysis of mobilities by exploring how to use this paradigm to frame major intercultural events (e.g., the Age of Discovery, the Grand Tour, and migrations) as they are articulated in narratives of diverse types (e.g., novels, journalism, diaries, and films). In particular, we will consider the motivations, knowledge, technologies, affects, meanings, and power relations of narratives of these movements.


GERM 520C, Narratives of Migration
Instructor: Markus Hallensleben

Thursdays, 2:00 - 4:00 pm

This course focuses on narratives of migration from a comparative studies point of view. It aims to provide an interdisciplinary framework for the investigation of transnational literature within the wider context of the global mobility turn and critical European Studies, with a special emphasis on the most recent German-language post-migration literature that appeared since the European “refugee crisis” in 2015. While one part of the course will utilize the sociological concepts of post-migration and superdiverse societies for an analysis of literary narratives as counter-narratives to Eurocentric, ethnically and nationally centred models of belonging, another part will investigate select primary texts. This course is taught in English with a directed study approach, including portfolio components in preparation for the final essay. The course is open to graduate students from all fields who work on narratives of migration in any context, whether in theory or praxis. Students are welcome to incorporate their own research and will present on at least one course related topic based on their own annotated working bibliographies.