About

Huabin Zhou, MA, Department of Anthropology.

Huabin Zhou is a second-year MA student in socio-cultural anthropology at the University of British Columbia. His general interests include food and culinary practices, memories and nostalgia, and Chinese diasporic/immigrant communities in North America. His master research will focus on the regional foodway of Chinese communities in the Metro Vancouver area. By centering upon peoples’ affective narratives about food, while highlighting the entanglement of Chinese immigrants’ bodies, their household food, and the shared histories and memories embodied in the multisensory act of preparing and consuming the particular dish, Zhou hopes to understand how do food (including its ingredients) and associated culinary practices reflect various migration trajectories. More importantly, to see their significance in shaping the placemaking process and negotiation of a sense of belonging among Vancouver’s Chinese communities.


Huabin Zhou, MA, Department of Anthropology.

Huabin Zhou is a second-year MA student in socio-cultural anthropology at the University of British Columbia. His general interests include food and culinary practices, memories and nostalgia, and Chinese diasporic/immigrant communities in North America. His master research will focus on the regional foodway of Chinese communities in the Metro Vancouver area. By centering upon peoples' affective narratives about food, while highlighting the entanglement of Chinese immigrants' bodies, their household food, and the shared histories and memories embodied in the multisensory act of preparing and consuming the particular dish, Zhou hopes to understand how do food (including its ingredients) and associated culinary practices reflect various migration trajectories. More importantly, to see their significance in shaping the placemaking process and negotiation of a sense of belonging among Vancouver's Chinese communities.

Huabin Zhou, MA, Department of Anthropology.

Huabin Zhou is a second-year MA student in socio-cultural anthropology at the University of British Columbia. His general interests include food and culinary practices, memories and nostalgia, and Chinese diasporic/immigrant communities in North America. His master research will focus on the regional foodway of Chinese communities in the Metro Vancouver area. By centering upon peoples' affective narratives about food, while highlighting the entanglement of Chinese immigrants' bodies, their household food, and the shared histories and memories embodied in the multisensory act of preparing and consuming the particular dish, Zhou hopes to understand how do food (including its ingredients) and associated culinary practices reflect various migration trajectories. More importantly, to see their significance in shaping the placemaking process and negotiation of a sense of belonging among Vancouver's Chinese communities.