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2020-21 Courses

GRADUATE COURSES

POLI 516C / PPGA 591H: Debates in Migration and Citizenship (Term 2)
Instructor: Antje Ellermann
Tuesdays, 9 - 12 PM

Human mobility has become one of the most contested issues in contemporary politics. This seminar surveys key scholarly debates in the study of migration and citizenship in political science and cognate disciplines. We comparatively examine in both historical and cross– national perspective the ways in which states and societies (particularly in the Global North) have responded to, and have become transformed by, immigration. The course covers a wide range of topics: theories of international migration and immigration regimes, theoretical approaches to migration studies, immigration and settler colonialism, the ethics of borders, migration control, public opinion on immigration, voting behaviour and populist radical right parties, the making of immigration policy, national identity and citizenship, immigrant inclusion, and multiculturalism and religion.

Geography 535 (3): An introduction to international migration and settlement (Term 1)
Instructor: Dan Hiebert
Wednesdays, 9:30 - 12:30  [ via synchronous e-seminar ]

Geography 535 is designed to introduce a broad set of issues and approaches to the study of international migration and settlement. The first part of the course will survey key concepts and theories of migration, and the question of regulation, particularly the balance of power between the international order vs. national regulatory systems. This will involve a discussion of how migration policies are framed and operationalized, and we will also discuss how these processes and decisions are changing due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. Next, we consider several major issues that intersect with migration: national security, technology, and gender. The third set of seminars will focus on what could be called ‘transactional’ concerns: how people traverse boundaries and make connections between places; and how Europe attempts to control migration from surrounding regions, as well as migrants within the EU. Finally, the course will close on the question of integration policies and processes, particularly the recent challenges to the idea of multiculturalism (which was so widely supported a generation ago), and the concern that has arisen over the relationship between diversity and social cohesion.

GERM 520A (3): Narratives of Migration (Term 1)
Instructor: Markus Hallensleben
Thursdays, 10:00 - 12:30 PM (synchronously online via UBC Canvas)

This course focuses on narratives of migration from a comparative studies point of view. While one part of the course will utilize Social Studies concepts of postmigration, super- diversity and plurality for an analysis of literary narratives as counter-narratives to Eurocentric, ethnically and nationally centred models of belonging, another part will investigate contemporary German-language authors who write about flight, immigration and refuge. How do their narratives perform hybrid and plural identities that go across borders, including the dealing with memories of colonial history, genocides and wars?

MUSC 403/532: Western Art Music and 19th-Century Globalization (Term 2)
Instructor: Claudio Vellutini
Mondays, 1:00 - 3:30 pm

This course explores the dissemination, performance, and consumption of Western Art Music across the world in the long nineteenth century. What happens when European art music migrates across the globe? Who brought and consumed European music outside Europe? What institutions facilitated the global consumption of European music? How did these patterns of dissemination shape processes of encounter between European and non-European peoples? How did they contribute to forms of cultural hybridity? How did they participate to colonial and hegemonic practices? This seminar address these and other questions by engaging students in substantial discussions on assigned repertory and readings.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

CLST 404B: Race, Racism and Ancient History (Term 2)
Instructor: Franco De Angelis
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30 - 11:00 am

The Greeks and Romans are credited with inventing some of the earliest recognizable forms of modernity, such as rationality, democracy, progress, philosophy, law, roads, and art and architecture. Should racism also be included among their inventions? In this seminar course, we will critically investigate two main questions: 1) Did the Greeks and Romans invent race and racism? 2) What impacts have race and racism had on modern scholarship relating to ancient history? The course will range widely beyond the Greeks and Romans to include other peoples, such as Egyptians, Ethiopians, Scythians, Phoenicians, Jews, and Persians, whose ancient histories have been affected by questions of race and racism whether in relation to Greeks and Romans or on their own. Students will be exposed to the latest readings and thinking about these topics and will be offered the opportunity to engage in scholarly debates and present their own research findings.

POLI 308Z: Canadian Response to the Global Refugee Crisis (Term 2) -- Student Directed Seminar (SDS)
Instructor: Saya Soma & Credo Casmil (faculty sponsor: Jenny Peterson)
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00 - 2:30 pm

This seminar will analyze the Canadian approach to providing asylum for those who are forcibly displaced. Using the framework of three durable solutions proposed by the UNHCR, we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of Canada’s asylum infrastructure. The subjects of analyses include the Canadian definition of ‘a refugee,’ asylum legal framework, private sector’s role in resettlement sponsorship, NGOs’ support networks, individual programs supporting refugees like the Student Refugee Program by WUSC + UBC, and so on. The seminar will consist of discussions, presentations, and possible speakers from refugee-related organizations. Through the group project and corresponding term paper, students will examine specific issues within the Canadian refugee support system and propose possible solutions.  

POLI 328C: The Comparative Politics of Immigration (Term 1)
Instructor: Antje Ellermann
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm -- web-oriented course

Human mobility has become one of the most contested issues in contemporary politics. This course provides an introduction to key scholarly debates in the study of migration and citizenship in political science and related disciplines. We comparatively examine the ways in which states and societies (particularly in the Global North) have responded to, and have become transformed by, immigration. We also seek to understand the multifold experiences of immigrants. The course covers a wide range of themes: theories of international migration, forced migration and humanitarian protection, immigration and settler colonialism, public opinion on immigration, the politics of immigration, the ethics of borders, the politics of borders, and the politics of immigrant inclusion.

GEOG 353: Geographies of Migration and Settlement (Term 1) 
Instructor: Dan Hiebert
Tuesdays, 3:30 - 5:00 pm -- web-oriented course 

Theoretical and applied perspectives on international migration and settlement. Includes analysis of: international regulation of migration; changing global demographics and their impact on migration; immigration policies of nation states; international migration patterns; settlement policies and outcomes; Canadian immigration policy.

GERM 206/302: Exile, Flight and Migration (in English) (Term 2)
Instructor: Markus Hallensleben
Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 - 3:30 PM

This new course aims to introduce to the current themes and historical settings of exile, flight and migration. We will critically discuss topics such as diasporic and national belonging, asylum and integration politics, multiculturality and European cultural identity. All readings are in translation and focus on contemporary transnational German-language literature and film affected by migration. While the beginning of the course covers Jewish and political exile during National Socialism, the other parts deal with Germany as an immigration country since the fall of the wall in 1989, including its “Welcome Culture” as response to the global “refugee crisis” in 2015. This course fulfills the Arts Literature requirement.

HIST 104: Global Migration (Term 2)
Instructor: Benjamin Bryce 
Monday and Wednesday, 4:00 - 5:00 PM

This course explores the mass migration of people since 1840. Taking a global perspective, it starts with the rise of industrial and export-oriented economies and continues to contemporary issues of border regulation and refugees. Topics include work, empire, exclusion, forced migration, memory, and multiculturalism. 

HIST 403: Migration in the Americas (Term 1)
Instructor: Benjamin Bryce 
Mondays, 12:00 - 2:00 PM -- online

This course highlights the centrality of migration and cultural pluralism in the history of the Americas. It focuses on the people who migrate and on the responses of government officials, workers, politicians, and other migrant groups to new arrivals. Topics include diplomacy, government policies, gender, the construction of racial categories, and nationalism. 

ITST377: Cultural Exchange Between Modern Italy and China (Term 1) 
Instructor: Gaoheng Zhang
Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30 - 4:00 PM --web-oriented course

Since Marco Polo, Italy’s communication with China has been the longest in Europe on written record. In the 20th century, increased mobility intensified cultural exchanges between the two countries. This course will examine these encoutners by questioning notions of the self and the other, hybrid cultural identities, and intercultural communication. Ultimately, we will put Italian and European interpretations of China as a rising superpower in perspective. 

LAW 377: Immigration Law (Term 2)
Instructor: Asha Kaushal
Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:30 pm

Immigration law determines who gets into Canada and on what terms. This course will examine the framework for entry, residence, and citizenship established by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Students will learn the criteria for the various immigration classes. Topics will include: family immigration, skilled workers, international students, temporary foreign workers, provincial nominee programs, criminal and medical inadmissibility, and removals (including detention and deportation). We will also examine the intersection between immigration law and other fields of law such as international law and constitutional law. This course focuses primarily on the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and its regulations and case law, but attention will be paid throughout to the historical, philosophical, and normative aspects of immigration law. Students will be asked to think critically about how immigration law treats different classes of people.

MUSC 403/532: Western Art Music and 19th-Century Globalization (Term 2)
Instructor: Claudio Vellutini
Mondays, 1:00 - 3:30 pm

This course explores the dissemination, performance, and consumption of Western Art Music across the world in the long nineteenth century. What happens when European art music migrates across the globe? Who brought and consumed European music outside Europe? What institutions facilitated the global consumption of European music? How did these patterns of dissemination shape processes of encounter between European and non-European peoples? How did they contribute to forms of cultural hybridity? How did they participate to colonial and hegemonic practices? This seminar address these and other questions by engaging students in substantial discussions on assigned repertory and readings.

SOC 303 201: Sociology of Migration (Term 2)
Instructor: Amanda Cheong
Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30 - 4:00 pm

This course introduces students to major sociological theories and debates within migration studies. We begin with an overview of major theoretical debates for understanding migration and displacement, followed by theories of the state. We then consider concepts and frameworks for understanding immigrant incorporation across various domains, including culture, the political sphere, and the labour market. The third part of the course investigates legal mechanisms of exclusion, namely citizenship and legal status. Theoretical discussions will be grounded in empirical examples both within and beyond the North American context.