Xiaojun Li

Associate Professor

About

Xiaojun (pronounced “shee·ow ji·win”) received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. He is currently Associate Professor of Political Science at UBC and non-resident scholar at the 21st Century China Centre at UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy. He has also held visiting positions at Harvard University’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies (2014-2015), Fudan Development Institute (2016), and University of Hawaii’s East-West Center (2018).

His research related to immigration explores international migration flows and participation in global value chains and public attitudes toward immigrants in advanced industrialized countries.

 


Xiaojun Li

Associate Professor

Xiaojun (pronounced “shee·ow ji·win”) received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. He is currently Associate Professor of Political Science at UBC and non-resident scholar at the 21st Century China Centre at UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy. He has also held visiting positions at Harvard University’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies (2014-2015), Fudan Development Institute (2016), and University of Hawaii’s East-West Center (2018).

His research related to immigration explores international migration flows and participation in global value chains and public attitudes toward immigrants in advanced industrialized countries.

 

Xiaojun Li

Associate Professor

Xiaojun (pronounced “shee·ow ji·win”) received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. He is currently Associate Professor of Political Science at UBC and non-resident scholar at the 21st Century China Centre at UC San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy. He has also held visiting positions at Harvard University’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies (2014-2015), Fudan Development Institute (2016), and University of Hawaii’s East-West Center (2018).

His research related to immigration explores international migration flows and participation in global value chains and public attitudes toward immigrants in advanced industrialized countries.